#OTD in 1846 – Birth of statesman, Charles Stewart Parnell, in Avondale, Co Wicklow.

Known as the “Ireland’s Uncrowned King,” Charles Stewart Parnell was haughty and aloof yet became a stirring political leader. He died at the age of 45, after a career marked by dramatic triumphs and a disastrous personal scandal. For someone strongly associated with the cause of Ireland’s rebellion against British rule, Charles Stewart Parnell had […]

Read More
Advertisements

#OTD in 1848 – ‘Saturday Review’ Racist Anti-Irish Rant.

On this day in 1848, the ‘The Saturday Review’ responded to comments from Archbishop John McHale (The Lion of St. Jarlaths) as to how emigration was bleeding Ireland dry with an astonishingly racist rant. “(A)nd in a letter to Mr. Gladstone he sighs… over the departing demons of assassination and murder. Like his friend Mr. […]

Read More

#OTD in 1846 – Birth of statesman, Charles Stewart Parnell, in Avondale, Co Wicklow.

Known as the “Ireland’s Uncrowned King,” Charles Stewart Parnell was haughty and aloof yet became a stirring political leader. He died at the age of 45, after a career marked by dramatic triumphs and a disastrous personal scandal. For someone strongly associated with the cause of Ireland’s rebellion against British rule, Charles Stewart Parnell had […]

Read More

#OTD in 1848 – ‘Saturday Review’ Racist Anti-Irish Rant.

On this day in 1848, the ‘The Saturday Review’ responded to comments from Archbishop John McHale (The Lion of St. Jarlaths) as to how emigration was bleeding Ireland dry with an astonishingly racist rant. “(A)nd in a letter to Mr. Gladstone he sighs… over the departing demons of assassination and murder. Like his friend Mr. […]

Read More

#OTD in 1846 – Birth of statesman, Charles Stewart Parnell, in Avondale, Co Wicklow.

Known as the “Ireland’s Uncrowned King,” Charles Stewart Parnell was haughty and aloof yet became a stirring political leader. He died at the age of 45, after a career marked by dramatic triumphs and a disastrous personal scandal. For someone strongly associated with the cause of Ireland’s rebellion against British rule, Charles Stewart Parnell had […]

Read More

1848 – ‘Saturday Review’ Racist Anti-Irish Rant. As Ireland haemorrhaged population via starvation and emigration, it received little support from elements of the English press.

On this day in 1848, the ‘The Saturday Review’ responded to comments from Archbishop John McHale (The Lion of St. Jarlaths) as to how emigration was bleeding Ireland dry with an astonishingly racist rant. “(A)nd in a letter to Mr. Gladstone he sighs… over the departing demons of assassination and murder. Like his friend Mr. […]

Read More

1846 – Irish statesman, Charles Stewart Parnell, is born in Avondale, Co Wicklow.

Known as the “Ireland’s Uncrowned King,” Charles Stewart Parnell was haughty and aloof yet became a stirring political leader. He died at the age of 45, after a career marked by dramatic triumphs and a disastrous personal scandal. For someone strongly associated with the cause of Ireland’s rebellion against British rule, Charles Stewart Parnell had […]

Read More

1848 – ‘The Saturday Review’ Racist Anti-Irish Rant. As Ireland haemorrhaged population via starvation and emigration, it received little support from elements of the English press.

On this day in 1848, the ‘The Saturday Review’ responded to comments from Archbishop John McHale (The Lion of St. Jarlaths) as to how emigration was bleeding Ireland dry with an astonishingly racist rant. “(A)nd in a letter to Mr. Gladstone he sighs… over the departing demons of assassination and murder. Like his friend Mr. […]

Read More

1882 – Kilmainham Treaty signed by Charles Stewart Parnell and British Government.

Along with other Land League leaders, including Charles Stewart Parnell and Michael Davitt were sent to prison in 1881 for making speeches criticising the government. Gladstone’s 1881 Land Act granted the three Fs, but ignored certain other problems, including the plight of tenants who were in arrears with their rent, meaning they owed back rent. […]

Read More

1886 – Home Rule Bill introduced in English Parliament by Gladstone.

Liberal Prime Minister William Gladstone’s government introduces the First Home Rule Bill (The Government of Ireland Bill 1886) in the British Parliament. The bill was designed to create a devolved Irish assembly and allow elements of autonomy for Ireland which had been under direct English parliamentary rule since the 1800 Act of Union. The initial […]

Read More