2010 – Prior to the publication of the Saville Report, thousands of people converge at the Bloody Sunday memorial to walk to the Guildhall, symbolically completing the march which was prevented from reaching its destination in 1972.

Results of Bloody Sunday Inquiry under the aegis of Lord Saville are published twelve years after it was established by Prime Minister Tony Blair. The hard-hitting findings made a mockery of the Widgery Tribunal whitewash of 1972 and elicited a historic apology from Prime Minister David Cameron in the House of Commons. Saville’s core finding […]

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Today in Irish History – 5th June:

1646 – Eoghan Rua O’Neill, a superb military strategist, defeats Robert Munro’s Scottish army at Benburb in Co. Tyrone. The victory is celebrated by Pope Innocent X with a Te Deum in Rome. 1686 – Richard Talbot, the Earl of Tyrconnell, appointed Lord Deputy of Ireland, (the first Catholic to hold the position since the […]

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Today in Irish History – 23rd May:

1561 – The first court of High Commission, a group of officials and Protestant clergy, is set up to enforce the Reformation in Ireland. 1754 – Birth of Dr. William Drennan in Belfast; physician, poet, educationalist political radical and one of the chief architects of the Society of United Irishmen. Drennan’s poetic output included some […]

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Today in Irish History – 16th May:

587 – St. Brendan the Navigator, early transatlantic voyager, dies. In the liturgical calendar, today is St. Brendan’s Feast Day. 1907 – Birth of Robert Tisdall, gold medalist in the 400 meter hurdles at the 1932 Olympics. 1920 – ‘Soviets’ are proclaimed in 13 Co. Limerick creameries, including Knocklong. 1921 – Two IRA men are […]

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Today in Irish History – 18th April:

1608 – Sir Cahir O’Doherty of Inishowen revolts and sacks Derry. 1689 – Siege of Derry begins. 1690 – Five regiments of Irishmen sail for France and form the nucleus of France’s Irish Brigade. 1768 – Daniel Murray, Archbishop of Dublin, is born in Arklow, Co. Wicklow. 1778 – William Bunbury, MP for Co. Carlow, […]

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1998 – The Northern Ireland peace talks end with an historic agreement. The accord – dubbed the Good Friday Agreement – is reached after nearly two years of talks and 30 years of conflict.

The Belfast Agreement is also known as the Good Friday Agreement, because it was reached on Good Friday, 10 April 1998. It was an agreement, between the British and Irish governments and most of the political parties in Northern Ireland, about how Northern Ireland should be governed. The talks leading up to the Agreement dealt […]

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1976 – The Maguire Seven: Guilty in Law; Innocent in Fact.

Forced (beaten) confessions, contaminated forensic kits, a rush to justice following IRA atrocities on the British mainland and sloppy police practices ensures that Anne Maguire, her husband Patrick, sons Vincent 17, Patrick 14, brother, brother-in-law and a family friend are found guilty of possessing explosives at their London Home and passing them on to the […]

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Today in Irish History – 26 February:

1797 – The Bank of Ireland suspends gold payments. 1854 – William Smith O’Brien, leader of the 1848 rebellion, is pardoned. 1923 – Meeting of Anti-Treaty IRA officers assembles at Ballinageary in Co Tipperary. Officers from the First Southern Division report that, “in a short time we would not have a man left owing to […]

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1998 – The British government bows to pressure and announces a new judicial inquiry into the killing of 14 unarmed civil rights marchers in Derry on January 30, 26 years ago.

Following extensive lobbying, British Prime Minister Tony Blair announces a new judicial enquiry, headed by Lord Saville, into the events of Bloody Sunday, January 30 1972 when 14 civilians were killed by British troops. The original enquiry conducted by Lord Widgery, where he exonerated the military of all blame was seen as a total whitewash […]

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2007 – At a special Ard Fheis, held in the RDS in Dublin, Sinn Féin voted to end its 86-year-old boycott of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) and the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI). Speaking moments after the vote is taken, party President Gerry Adams describes the decision as “truly historic” and says the potential had been created to change the political landscape of the island “forever.”

Sinn Féin, the Irish political party widely regarded as the political wing of the Provisional Irish Republican Army, has voted to accept the Police Service of Northern Ireland at an ard fheis (party conference) held in Dublin. 982 party members voted on the motion at the conference, where over 2,500 people were in attendance. Surprisingly, […]

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