#OTD in 1846 – Birth of statesman, Charles Stewart Parnell, in Avondale, Co Wicklow.

Known as the “Ireland’s Uncrowned King,” Charles Stewart Parnell was haughty and aloof yet became a stirring political leader. He died at the age of 45, after a career marked by dramatic triumphs and a disastrous personal scandal. For someone strongly associated with the cause of Ireland’s rebellion against British rule, Charles Stewart Parnell had […]

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#OTD in 1883 – Execution of Joe Brady for the murder of Lord Cavendish in Phoenix Park.

Brady was one of the Invincibles – a Fenian splinter group – that murdered the Chief Secretary of Ireland on his first day in the country. Four others were executed for the murders. Brady by all accounts was a mountain of a man. The Times wrote after his execution. “He was brought up as a […]

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#OTD in 1882 – Phoenix Park murders: The British chief secretary of Ireland, Lord Frederick Cavendish, and his under secretary, T.H. Burke are murdered.

Arriving in Dublin on 6 May 1882, the Chief Secretary for Ireland, Frederick Cavendish (who was married to the niece of British Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone), attended to some formal business in Dublin Castle, the seat of the British government, before walking home to the Viceregal Lodge in the Phoenix Park. Joining Cavendish in […]

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#OTD in Irish History – 6 May:

1074 – Donatus (or Dunan), the first Bishop of Dublin, dies on this date and is buried in Christ Church Cathedral. Patrick, his successor, is sent to Canterbury for consecration (records are unreliable – the date of his death is also recorded as 23 November). 1384 – Philip de Courtenay lands at Dalkey and campaigns […]

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#OTD in 1891 – Death of painter and artist, Augustus Nicholas Burke.

Born in 1828 in Co Galway, Augustus Burke was a regular exhibitor at the Royal Academy in London and the Royal Hibernian Academy in Dublin. He resided in Holland and Brittany for a number of years before returning to Dublin. His portraits include a Breton Farmyard; The Feast-day of Notre Dame de Tremala, Brittany and […]

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#OTD in 1846 – Birth of statesman, Charles Stewart Parnell, in Avondale, Co Wicklow.

Known as the “Ireland’s Uncrowned King,” Charles Stewart Parnell was haughty and aloof yet became a stirring political leader. He died at the age of 45, after a career marked by dramatic triumphs and a disastrous personal scandal. For someone strongly associated with the cause of Ireland’s rebellion against British rule, Charles Stewart Parnell had […]

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#OTD in 1883 – Execution of Joe Brady for the murder of Lord Cavendish in Phoenix Park.

Brady was one of the Invincibles – a Fenian splinter group – that murdered the Chief Secretary of Ireland on his first day in the country. Four others were executed for the murders. Brady by all accounts was a mountain of a man. The Times wrote after his execution. “He was brought up as a […]

Read More

#OTD in 1882 – Phoenix Park murders: The British chief secretary of Ireland, Lord Frederick Cavendish, and his under secretary, T.H. Burke are murdered.

Arriving in Dublin on 6 May 1882, the Chief Secretary for Ireland, Frederick Cavendish (who was married to the niece of British Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone), attended to some formal business in Dublin Castle, the seat of the British government, before walking home to the Viceregal Lodge in the Phoenix Park. Joining Cavendish in […]

Read More

#OTD in Irish History – 6 May:

1074 – Donatus (or Dunan), the first Bishop of Dublin, dies on this date and is buried in Christ Church Cathedral. Patrick, his successor, is sent to Canterbury for consecration (records are unreliable – the date of his death is also recorded as 23 November). 1384 – Philip de Courtenay lands at Dalkey and campaigns […]

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#OTD in 1889 – Richard Piggott, who had a long-standing hatred of Charles Stewart Parnell, is exposed as forger of ‘Times’ Phoenix Park letters.

The Parnell Commission was a judicial inquiry in the late 1880s into allegations of crimes by parliamentarian Charles Stewart Parnell which resulted in his vindication. On 6 May 1882 two leading members of the British Government in Ireland, Chief Secretary for Ireland Lord Frederick Cavendish and the Permanent Under-Secretary for Ireland T.H. Burke were stabbed […]

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