#OTD in 1649 – Siege of Drogheda ends | The first siege occurred during the Irish Rebellion of 1641, when Phelim O’Neill and the insurgents failed to take the town.

Drogheda was one of the best-fortified towns in Ireland. The main part of the town was north of the River Boyne, with a smaller district to the south. The two districts were connected by a drawbridge across the river. The town was protected by a circuit of walls four to six feet wide and twenty […]

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#OTD in Irish History – 10 September:

World Suicide Prevention Day – #WSPD 1315 – Battle of Connor: Major victory for Edward the Bruce in his invasion of Ulster. 1602 – “Red” Hugh O’Donnell dies in Simancas, Spain; evidence suggests he was poisoned by an English spy. 1649 – Oliver Cromwell seizes Drogheda. 1763 – The Freeman’s Journal is founded in Dublin […]

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#OTD in 1658 – Nine years after the Siege of Drogheda starts, Oliver Cromwell dies.

“God made them as stubble to our swords.” –Oliver Cromwell Cromwell was a viciously effective soldier and rabid anti-Catholic is without question. That he killed thousands of Irish is without question. Apologists of the Lord Protector say, that his tactics were “the norm” for warfare in the 1600s. Intriguingly, the most hated and reviled man […]

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#OTD in Irish History – 3 September:

In the Liturgical calendar, it is the Feast day of St McNisse, baptised by St Patrick, and later consecrated him the first abbot-bishop of Kells, which became the diocese of Connor. 1649 – The Siege of Drogheda begins. 1654 – The first Protectorate parliament meets; Ireland is represented by 30 members. 1658 – Nine years […]

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Lady Well Killyon Ceremonies – Boyne Valley, Co Meath

The site of Lady Well in Killyon is typical of the sites of holy wells in the Boyne valley. There is a tumulus nearby which shows that the place was of importance in pagan times. The site of Lady Well in Killyon had probably been an important chief’s residence at the time of St Patrick, […]

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#OTD in Irish History – 15 August:

In the Liturgical calendar, today is the Feast of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary. It is also the feast day of St. Daga, 6th century Bishop of Iniskin, Dundalk. Lady’s Day in Ireland, the Feast of the Assumption of Mary, and is a day when fairs are celebrated in many country towns. 1599 – […]

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#OTD in 1649 – Oliver Cromwell sets sail for Ireland and the commencement of one the most vicious military campaigns inflicted on Ireland.

On his arrival, he was received with all possible demonstrations of joy; the great guns echoing forth their welcome, and the acclamations of the people resounding in every street. Cromwell came into the city — where the concourse of people was very great, they were all flocking to see him of whom they had heard […]

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Key Events in Irish History

An island people the Irish may be, yet the history of Ireland has never been intolerant or inward-looking. Instead, it is a story of a people profoundly aware of the wider world – its threats, its possibilities and its advantages. In addition, while the English and British connection will always remain key to any reading […]

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The King’s Head Pub – Galway’s Latin Quarter

The Kings Head dates back over 800 years with research showing the building in existence since the 13th century. The building was the home of the Mayor of Galway, Thomas Lynch Fitz-Ambrose. Following the execution of the King of England Charles I on 30 January 1649, Cromwell’s army came to Ireland to assert their authority. […]

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#OTD in 1581 – The Wexford Martyrs were hanged, drawn and quartered.

The Wexford Martyrs were Patrick Cavanagh, Matthew Lambert, Edward Cheevers, Robert Tyler and two others whose names are not known. They were found guilty of treason for aiding in the escape of James Eustace, Viscount Baltinglass. James Eustace, whose family had links with Clongowes Wood Castle, now a Jesuit boarding school near Dublin, joined the […]

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