Marriage and Brehon Law in Ancient Ireland

Irish history is immersed in centuries of oppression that was particularly harsh in respect to the Catholic religion. The late 17th and 18th century Penal Laws prevented priests from celebrating mass never mind conducting the sacrament of marriage. If a priest was caught, sanctions were quite severe, in fact, punishable by death. The last of […]

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#OTD in 1997 – After a contentious court battle contesting the referendum, the new divorce law in the Republic is enacted.

The amendment was narrowly approved by 50.23 percent of the voters — a 9,118-ballot margin out of 1.6 million cast. Fears that divorce would lead to the end of family life in Ireland have proven unfounded, according to ‘One Family’, the organisation that supports people parenting alone, sharing parenting, and separating. Reflecting on the anniversary […]

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Ancient Irish (Brehon) Law and Divorce

In early Celtic Ireland, grounds for divorce included sexual impotence due to gross obesity, telling tales about your love life, or being a thief. There was also a virgin-price that guaranteed the wife’s purity. It’s also interesting to note that if two people of unequal rank wanted to marry, the person of lower rank was […]

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#OTD in 1170 – Richard de Clare (Strongbow) marries Aoife Ní MacMurrough and sets a precedent for Norman rule in Ireland.

Aoife Ní MacMurrough, also known by later historians as Eva of Leinster, was a noble, princess of Leinster and countess of Pembroke. She was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough, King of Leinster and his second wife, Mor O’Toole, a relation of St Lawrence O’Toole. Following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, she married […]

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Marriage and Brehon Law in Ancient Ireland

Irish history is immersed in centuries of oppression that was particularly harsh in respect to the Catholic religion. The late 17th and 18th century Penal Laws prevented priests from celebrating mass never mind conducting the sacrament of marriage. If a priest was caught, sanctions were quite severe, in fact, punishable by death. The last of […]

Read More

#OTD in 1997 – After a contentious court battle contesting the referendum, the new divorce law in the Republic is enacted.

The amendment was narrowly approved by 50.23 percent of the voters — a 9,118-ballot margin out of 1.6 million cast. Fears that divorce would lead to the end of family life in Ireland have proven unfounded, according to ‘One Family’, the organisation that supports people parenting alone, sharing parenting, and separating. Reflecting on the anniversary […]

Read More

Brehon Law, Irish Law and Divorce

In early Celtic Ireland, grounds for divorce included sexual impotence due to gross obesity, telling tales about your love life, or being a thief. There was also a virgin-price that guaranteed the wife’s purity. It’s also interesting to note that if two people of unequal rank wanted to marry, the person of lower rank was […]

Read More

Marriage and Brehon Law in Ancient Ireland

Irish history is immersed in centuries of oppression that was particularly harsh in respect to the Catholic religion. The late 17th and 18th century Penal Laws prevented priests from celebrating mass never mind conducting the sacrament of marriage. If a priest was caught, sanctions were quite severe, in fact, punishable by death. The last of […]

Read More

#OTD in 1997 – Divorce became legal in Ireland.

The amendment was narrowly approved by 50.23 percent of the voters — a 9,118-ballot margin out of 1.6 million cast. Fears that divorce would lead to the end of family life in Ireland have proven unfounded, according to ‘One Family’, the organisation that supports people parenting alone, sharing parenting, and separating. Reflecting on the anniversary […]

Read More

Brehon Law, Irish Law and Divorce

In early Celtic Ireland, grounds for divorce included sexual impotence due to gross obesity, telling tales about your love life, or being a thief. There was also a virgin-price that guaranteed the wife’s purity. It’s also interesting to note that if two people of unequal rank wanted to marry, the person of lower rank was […]

Read More