#OTD in 1649 – Sack of Wexford.

After the fall of Drogheda in September 1649, the Marquis of Ormond retreated to Kilkenny with his remaining forces, abandoning the garrisons of Trim and Dundalk. With the losses sustained at Rathmines and Drogheda, Ormond was unable to muster an army strong enough to challenge Cromwell, which left the north-western approaches to Dublin secure for […]

Read More

#OTD in 1649 – Siege of Drogheda ends | The first siege occurred during the Irish Rebellion of 1641, when Phelim O’Neill and the insurgents failed to take the town.

Drogheda was one of the best-fortified towns in Ireland. The main part of the town was north of the River Boyne, with a smaller district to the south. The two districts were connected by a drawbridge across the river. The town was protected by a circuit of walls four to six feet wide and twenty […]

Read More

#OTD in 1650 – Kilkenny surrendered to Oliver Cromwell.

The success of Oliver Cromwell’s Irish campaign during the autumn of 1649 caused further divisions in the Marquis of Ormond’s Royalist-Confederate coalition. With the defeat of British and Scottish forces in Ulster and the defection of most of Lord Inchiquin’s Protestant troops to the Parliamentarians, Ormond was obliged to rely increasingly upon Catholic support. Early […]

Read More

#OTD in 1649 – Sack of Wexford.

After the fall of Drogheda in September 1649, the Marquis of Ormond retreated to Kilkenny with his remaining forces, abandoning the garrisons of Trim and Dundalk. With the losses sustained at Rathmines and Drogheda, Ormond was unable to muster an army strong enough to challenge Cromwell, which left the north-western approaches to Dublin secure for […]

Read More

#OTD in 1649 – Siege of Drogheda ends | The first siege occurred during the Irish Rebellion of 1641, when Phelim O’Neill and the insurgents failed to take the town.

Drogheda was one of the best-fortified towns in Ireland. The main part of the town was north of the River Boyne, with a smaller district to the south. The two districts were connected by a drawbridge across the river. The town was protected by a circuit of walls four to six feet wide and twenty […]

Read More

#OTD in 1650 – Kilkenny surrendered to Oliver Cromwell.

The success of Oliver Cromwell’s Irish campaign during the autumn of 1649 caused further divisions in the Marquis of Ormond’s Royalist-Confederate coalition. With the defeat of British and Scottish forces in Ulster and the defection of most of Lord Inchiquin’s Protestant troops to the Parliamentarians, Ormond was obliged to rely increasingly upon Catholic support. Early […]

Read More

#OTD in 1649 – Sack of Wexford.

After the fall of Drogheda in September 1649, the Marquis of Ormond retreated to Kilkenny with his remaining forces, abandoning the garrisons of Trim and Dundalk. With the losses sustained at Rathmines and Drogheda, Ormond was unable to muster an army strong enough to challenge Cromwell, which left the north-western approaches to Dublin secure for […]

Read More

#OTD in 1649 – Siege of Drogheda ends | The first siege occurred during the Irish Rebellion of 1641, when Phelim O’Neill and the insurgents failed to take the town.

Drogheda was one of the best-fortified towns in Ireland. The main part of the town was north of the River Boyne, with a smaller district to the south. The two districts were connected by a drawbridge across the river. The town was protected by a circuit of walls four to six feet wide and twenty […]

Read More

#OTD in 1650 – Kilkenny surrendered to Oliver Cromwell.

The success of Oliver Cromwell’s Irish campaign during the autumn of 1649 caused further divisions in the Marquis of Ormond’s Royalist-Confederate coalition. With the defeat of British and Scottish forces in Ulster and the defection of most of Lord Inchiquin’s Protestant troops to the Parliamentarians, Ormond was obliged to rely increasingly upon Catholic support. Early […]

Read More

#OTD in 1649 – Sack of Wexford.

After the fall of Drogheda in September 1649, the Marquis of Ormond retreated to Kilkenny with his remaining forces, abandoning the garrisons of Trim and Dundalk. With the losses sustained at Rathmines and Drogheda, Ormond was unable to muster an army strong enough to challenge Cromwell, which left the north-western approaches to Dublin secure for […]

Read More