#OTD in Irish History – 9 October:

1651 – The Navigation Act provides that goods imported to any Commonwealth lands shall be carried in English ships only. 1834 – Opening of the Dublin and Kingstown Railway, the first public railway on the island of Ireland. 1849 – First tenant protection society established at Callan, Co Kilkenny. 1895 – Victoria Cross winner Billy […]

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#OTD in 1750 – Death of highwayman, “Captain” James MacLaine.

Born in Co Monaghan, MacLaine was a notorious highwayman with his accomplice William Plunkett. He was known as the “Gentleman Highwayman” as a result of his courteous behaviour during his robberies. He famously robbed Horace Walpole, and was eventually hanged at Tyburn. The film Plunkett and Macleane was based loosely on his exploits. MacLaine was […]

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#OTD in 1918 – Hanna Sheehy Skeffington is recovering, at the Gower Hotel in London, from the effects of her recent hunger strike.

In a letter to her sister, Mary Kettle, Mrs Sheehy Skeffington stated that while she was still weak, this hunger strike was not as traumatic as those that she had undertaken on behalf of the women’s suffrage movement. Sheehy Skeffington went on hunger strike last week after being arrested on Dublin’s Westmoreland Street. She was […]

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#OTD in 1918 – The second anniversary of the execution of Roger Casement proved a quiet affair. 

In Kerry, police and military authorities made efforts to avoid the scenes of the year before by stationing troops at Casement’s Fort in Ardfert to deter crowds from assembling there. In various districts of Dublin, the Press Association reported that small buttonhole flags were being sold bearing the inscription ‘Remember Casement’ on one side and […]

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#OTD in 1921 – Just three days after a truce is implemented, Éamon de Valera, President of Dáil Éireann meets with British Prime Minister David Lloyd George in London.

Francis Stevenson, Private Secretary to Lloyd George recalled: “I have never seen David so excited as he was before de Valera arrived, at 4.30. He kept walking in and out of my room… As I told him afterwards, he was bringing up all his guns! He had a big map of the British Empire hung […]

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#OTD in 1991 – The convictions of the group of people known as the ‘Maguire Seven’ were quashed by the Court of Appeal in London.

The Court of Appeal overturns the sentences on the Maguire Seven. In 2005, Prime Minister Tony Blair apologised unreservedly for what happened. “I am very sorry that they were subject to such an ordeal and such an injustice. “They deserve to be completely and publicly exonerated.” Forced (beaten) confessions, contaminated forensic kits, a rush to […]

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