Irish Civil War | What Really Happened at Ballyseedy?

You can still find bullet-marked walls in Ballymullen Barracks, Tralee. There, young Kerrymen faced squads after “interrogation” carried out by officers beating them with a hammer. Worse than these “authorised killings” were the atrocities carried out “unofficially”. Of these, one-act will always stand out in infamy the blowing up of nine prisoners at Ballyseedy Cross […]

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Irish Civil War: What Really Happened At Ballyseedy?

You can still find bullet-marked walls in Ballymullen Barracks, Tralee. There, young Kerrymen faced squads after “interrogation” carried out by officers beating them with a hammer. Worse than these “authorised killings” were the atrocities carried out “unofficially”. Of these, one-act will always stand out in infamy the blowing up of nine prisoners at Ballyseedy Cross […]

Read More

Irish Civil War: What Really Happened At Ballyseedy!

You can still find bullet-marked walls in Ballymullen Barracks, Tralee. There, young Kerrymen faced squads after “interrogation” carried out by officers beating them with a hammer. Worse than these “authorised killings” were the atrocities carried out “unofficially”. Of these, one-act will always stand out in infamy the blowing up of nine prisoners at Ballyseedy Cross […]

Read More

What Really Happened At Ballyseedy! Irish Civil War

You can still find bullet-marked walls in Ballymullen Barracks, Tralee. There, young Kerrymen faced squads after “interrogation” carried out by officers beating them with a hammer. Worse than these “authorised killings” were the atrocities carried out “unofficially”. Of these, one act will always stand out in infamy the blowing up of nine prisoners at Ballyseedy […]

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1920 – The first ‘Black and Tans’ (auxiliary policemen) officially arrive in Ireland.

Although they would be operational for less than two years, the “Black and Tans” would become one of the most reviled names in Irish history. The English recruits to the RIC were mainly the unemployed veterans of World War I. Their principal motivation: employment for ten shillings a day. When the first recruits arrived in […]

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1923 – International Reaction to Government Executions.

The Irish government Representative in Washington, Timothy Smiddy wrote to External Affairs minister Desmond Fitzgerald about US concerns re the execution of Anti-Treaty Irregulars, especially the PR fallout if women were to be executed. “A report given last week to the American papers by Mrs Despard from Paris, (a cutting of which has already been […]

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1923 – Eleven Republican prisoners are executed by the Free State – two in Limerick, four in Tralee and five in Athlone.

In what was now becoming a brutal civil war between pro and anti-Treaty parties, the pro-treaty government had instituted in October 1921 an aggresive policy of execution of Republican prisoners or “Irregulars.” Here, you can read the final letter from Patrick Hennessy on the eve of his execution: http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/claremuseum/acquisitions/patrick_hennessy_letter.htm The Government’s view was that anti-Treaty […]

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