The King’s Head Pub | Galway’s Latin Quarter

The Kings Head dates back over 800 years with research showing the building in existence since the 13th century. The building was the home of the Mayor of Galway, Thomas Lynch Fitz-Ambrose. Following the execution of the King of England Charles I on 30 January 1649, Cromwell’s army came to Ireland to assert their authority. […]

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#OTD in 1848 – Young Irelander Rebellion | Tipperary Revolt – In Tipperary, an unsuccessful nationalist revolt against British rule is put down by police.

The Young Irelander Rebellion (sometimes called “Famine Rebellion” or the Battle of Ballingarry of 1848). It took place during the Great Irish Hunger (1845-1849) or ‘Battle of the Widow MacCormack’s cabbage garden’) was a failed uprising of the Young Ireland political movement, which took place on 29 July 1848 in the village of Ballingarry, Co […]

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#OTD in 1846 – O’Connell and the Young Irelanders party split over use of physical force.

The name Young Ireland was originally used in a disparaging way to describe the group of young Repeal Association members who were associated with The Nation newspaper. At the time, the Repeal Association was campaigning for the repeal of the Act of Union 1800 between the kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland. The term was […]

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#OTD in Irish History | 28 July:

1210 – King John captures William de Braose and confiscates his lands. 1674 – Birth of Charles Boyle, 4th Earl of Orrery; Jacobite soldier and editor. 1689 – The siege of Derry finally ends as naval boats in support of Williamite forces finally break the boom intended to prevent ships from resupplying the starving Protestant […]

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O’Doherty’s Keep and Buncrana Castle

On the northern bank of the River Crana as it enters Lough Swilly sits the three-story O’Doherty’s Keep, which is the only surviving part of an original 14th-century Norman castle. The first two levels of the keep were built after 1333. In 1601 the O’Doherty’s Keep was described as being a small, two-story castle, inhabited […]

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#OTD in 1669 – Molly Malone is purportedly christened in Dublin.

The song ‘Molly Malone’, also known as ‘Cockles and Mussels’ tells the story of an attractive fishmonger in Dublin named Molly Malone. The song tells how she died young of a fever and how her ghost still haunts the streets of Dublin where she plied her trade. The song is extremely popular in Ireland and […]

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#OTD in Irish History | 27 July:

1602 – O’Neill’s principal vassal, Donal O’Cahan, submits to Docwra. 1662 – Ormond becomes Lord Lieutenant and arrives in Ireland on this date. 1663 – The ‘Cattle Act’ restricts Irish trade with colonies as well as exports to England. 1669 – Molly Malone is purportedly christened in Dublin. Molly Malone’s baptismal and death certificates were […]

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Cave Hill, Belfast

Cave Hill, or Cavehill, is a basaltic hill overlooking the city of Belfast. It forms part of the southeastern border of the Antrim Plateau. It is distinguished by its famous ‘Napoleon’s Nose’, a basaltic outcrop which resembles the profile of the famous emperor Napoleon. Cavehill is also the name of an electoral ward in Belfast. […]

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#OTD in 1856 – Birth of playwright, critic and Nobel Prize laureate, George Bernard Shaw, in Dublin.

George Bernard Shaw was a dramatist and a literary critic in addition to being a socialist spokesman. His valuable contributions to literature won him the Nobel Prize for literature in 1925. While Shaw accepted the honour, he refused the money. He was a free spirit and a freethinker who advocated women’s rights and equality on […]

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