#OTD in 1916 – Easter Rising | The Surrender.

After six days that reduced much of central Dublin to ruin, British forces numbering close to 20,000 troops (many of them Irish) finally force a rebel force of 1,500 men and women to surrender. At 12.45pm, Elizabeth O’Farrell (one of the last three women left in the GPO before it was evacuated), left 15 Moore […]

Read More

#OTD in Irish History | 11 February:

In the Liturgical calendar today is the Feast Day of St Gobnait, also known as Gobnat or Mo Gobnat, a medieval, female saint whose church was Móin Mór, later Bairnech, in the village of Ballyvourney (Baile Bhuirne), Co Cork. She was associated with the Múscraige and her church and nunnery lay on the borders between […]

Read More

#OTD in 1916 – Easter Rising | The Surrender.

After six days that reduced much of central Dublin to ruin, British forces numbering close to 20,000 troops (many of them Irish) finally force a rebel force of 1,500 men and women to surrender. At 12.45pm, Elizabeth O’Farrell (one of the last three women left in the GPO before it was evacuated), left 15 Moore […]

Read More

#OTD in Irish History – 29 February:

29 February known as a leap day in the Gregorian calendar, the most widely used today, is a date that typically occurs once every four years evenly divisible by 4, such as 1976, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008 etc., with exception to century years evenly divisible by 100 and not divisible by 400 (ex. 1900 does […]

Read More

#OTD in 1916 – Easter Rising: The Surrender.

After six days that reduced much of central Dublin to ruin, British forces numbering close to 20,000 troops (many of them Irish) finally force a rebel force of 1,500 men and women to surrender. At 12.45pm, Elizabeth O’Farrell (one of the last three women left in the GPO before it was evacuated), left 15 Moore […]

Read More

#OTD in 1916 – Easter Rising: The Surrender.

After six days that reduced much of central Dublin to ruin, British forces numbering close to 20,000 troops (many of them Irish) finally force a rebel force of 1,500 men and women to surrender. At 12.45pm, Elizabeth O’Farrell (one of the last three women left in the GPO before it was evacuated), left 15 Moore […]

Read More

#OTD in 1901 – Birth of Maeve de Markievicz, daughter of Constance, in Lissadell, Co Sligo.

Maeve, named after the legendary Queen of Connacht, was born to Constance in Lissadell, Co Sligo on 13 November 1901. Her father, Constance’s husband, was Count Casimir Dunin-Markievicz, a nobleman whose family owned an estate at Zywotowka in the Ukraine. He already had a son, Stanislaw, from a previous marriage. Very soon after the birth, […]

Read More

#OTD in 1916 – Easter Rising: The Surrender.

After six days that reduced much of central Dublin to ruin, British forces numbering close to 20,000 troops (many of them Irish) finally force a rebel force of 1,500 men and women to surrender. At 12.45pm, Elizabeth O’Farrell (one of the last three women left in the GPO before it was evacuated), left 15 Moore […]

Read More

#OnThisDay in Irish History – 17 March:

In the Liturgical calendar, today is the feast day of St Patrick, Ireland’s patron saint. 1762 – St Patrick’s Day is celebrated in New York City for the first time (at the Crown and Thistle Tavern). 1776 – General George Washington used the password ‘St Patrick’ as a secret code for his Colonial troops on […]

Read More

#OTD in Irish History – 16 March:

In the liturgical calendar, today is the Feast Day of Abbán moccu Corbmaic. He was associated, first and foremost, with Mag Arnaide (Moyarney or Adamstown, near New Ross, Co Wexford) and with Cell Abbáin (Killabban, Co Laois). His cult was, however, also connected to other churches elsewhere in Ireland, notably that of his alleged sister […]

Read More