#OTD in 1862 – Guinness formally adopts the harp as its symbol.

Guinness uses the harp of Brian Boru, or Trinity College Harp as their trademark. This circa 14th century harp which is still visible at Trinity College, Dublin has been used as a symbol of Ireland since the 16th century. Guinness adopted the harp as a logo, however it is shown in a form that faces […]

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#OTD in Irish History – 5 April:

456 – St Patrick returns to Ireland as a missionary bishop. 584 – Death of St Ruadhan (Ruadán), one of the twelve ‘Apostles of Erin’. He died at the monastery of Lorrha, Co Tipperary. 1605 – Death of Adam Loftus. He was Archbishop of Armagh, and later Dublin, and Lord Chancellor of Ireland from 1581. […]

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#OTD in 1774 – Death of novelist, playwright and poet, Oliver Goldsmith.

Goldsmith lived a thoroughly interesting life, perennially in debt and always fearing the debtors prison. His literary work has been praised and decried. Following his graduation from Trinity College in 1749, he became a kind of wandering minstrel through mainland Europe until he finally settled in London in 1756 where he indulged in a bohemian […]

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#OTD in 1838 – The Sirius beat the much bigger and faster Great Western – the largest passenger ship in the world.

Sirius was a side-wheel wooden-hulled steamship built in 1837 for the London-Cork route operated by the Saint George Steam Packet Company. The next year, she opened transatlantic steam passenger service when she was chartered for two voyages by the British and American Steam Navigation Company. By arriving in New York a day ahead of the […]

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#OTD in Irish History – 4 April:

1774 – Death of novelist, playwright and poet, Oliver Goldsmith. 1818 – Birth of soldier, journalist, and writer of boys’ stories, Mayne Reid (pseudonym of Thomas Mayne) in Ballyroney, Co Down. 1838 – The Sirius was a side-wheel wooden-hulled steamship built in 1837 for the London-Cork postal route operated by the Saint George Steam Packet Company. At […]

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#OTD in 2018 – A new stamp goes on sale to commemorate the centenary of the founding of Cumann na mBan, designed by Ger Garland. 

Featuring Cumann na mBan members leading the funeral of people shot during the Howth arms landing. Cumann na mBan was a women’s nationalist organisation founded to advance the cause of Irish liberty. Its constitution provided for the use of force by arms against British forces in Ireland. Founding members included Jennie Wyse Power, Agnes O’Farrelly, Louise Gavan […]

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#OTD in 1980 – Kincora Scandal: ‘Boys suicide bids brought Kincora scandal to light’. Three staff members of the Kincora Boys Home, Belfast, were charged with acts of gross indecency.

The Kincora Boys’ Home was a boys’ home in Belfast, that was the scene of serious organised child sexual abuse, causing a scandal and attempted cover-up in 1980, with allegations of state collusion. The Northern Ireland Historical Institutional Abuse Inquiry began examining allegations relating to the Home on 31 May 2016, including claims that there […]

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Ruins of the O’Davoren Law School, Cahermacnaghten, Co Clare

The Ó Duibhdábhoireann (O’Davoren) family were scholarly clan of Corcomroe, Thomond (modern-day Co Clare), active since medieval times. Famed for their sponsorship of schools and knowledge of history and Early Irish law, the Uí Dhuibh dá Bhoireann were known throughout Ireland as a literary family and held estates in the Burren down to the mid […]

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#OTD in Irish History – 3 April:

1793 – Birth of scientific writer and lecturer, Dionysius Lardner, in Dublin. 1798 – Writer John Banim, who was praised by Yeats as a writer who tried to ‘make one see life plainly,’ is born in Kilkenny. 1807 – Maurice FitzGerald, MP for Co Kerry, resigns as Commissioner of the Treasury (UK) over the issue […]

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Sir Roger Casement – The Man Hanged as a Traitor Who Took on the Devil

Roger Casement (1864-1916) was an Irish nationalist and British consular official, whose attempt to secure aid from Germany in the struggle for Irish independence led to his execution by the British for the crime of high treason. Born on 1 September, 1864, in Kingstown, to a Protestant father and Catholic mother, Roger David Casement was […]

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