Ireland 1845–52

The public works consisted of building roads, walls and bridges for a salary of 8 pence per day. This strenuous work program was introduced at a time when the people were starving and weak. The salary was not sufficient for the people to regain their health or feed their families. To make matters worse the […]

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Ireland 1849

Sidney Osborne, English travel writer. “Seventy houses were pulled down, under the orders of the agent of the property. The people had for some days to crowd on the neighbouring chapel floor, and by the sides of the ditches, for the neighbours had orders not to take them in: it is fair to state the […]

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Ireland 1847

Asenath Nicholson “I gave a little boy a biscuit, and a thousand times since have I wished that it had been thrown into the sea; it could not save him. He took it between his bony hands, clasped it tight, and half-bent as he was, lifted them up, looked with his glaring eyes upon me, […]

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Ireland 1845–52

Opthalmia, an eye disease caused by lack of vitamin A, became prevalent causing blindness due to ulceration and keratomalacia, generally in one eye. It became common in workhouses and among children: 13,000 cases were recorded in 1849 and 27,000 in 1850. Taken from The Truth Behind The Irish Famine. 72 Paintings, 472 eyewitness quotes. http://www.jerrymulvihill.com

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Ireland 1845–52

Asenath Nicholson: “They walk fearlessly upon dangerous precipices and even descend to the sea in search of eggs, which the seagulls deposit there in the sides of the cliffs. Two men were dashed from a fearful height and dreadfully mangled, one was killed instantly, and the other lingered a few weeks and died.” The starving […]

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Ireland 1845–52

When it became a matter of eating or being eaten by the dogs and rats, the people killed, skinned, and ate the dogs and rats. Trapped rats were often chopped up, out of sight of the children, and a white, rabbit-like meat added to whatever gruel or herbal soup was cooking in the pot.” Taken […]

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#OTD in 1848 – The Paddle Steamer ‘The Londonderry’, with immigrants fleeing The Great Hunger, took shelter in Derry harbour.

The ‘Londonderry’, a paddle-steamer which berthed at the quayside in Derry one Sunday in the winter of 1848 was only seven years old, big for a ship of her kind, weighing 222 tons. She was manned by a crew of 26 and often sailed between Sligo and Liverpool. On this winter trip, while hugging the […]

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