Ireland 1849

Sidney Osborne, English travel writer. “Seventy houses were pulled down, under the orders of the agent of the property. The people had for some days to crowd on the neighbouring chapel floor, and by the sides of the ditches, for the neighbours had orders not to take them in: it is fair to state the […]

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Ireland 1847

Asenath Nicholson “I gave a little boy a biscuit, and a thousand times since have I wished that it had been thrown into the sea; it could not save him. He took it between his bony hands, clasped it tight, and half-bent as he was, lifted them up, looked with his glaring eyes upon me, […]

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Ireland 1845–52

Opthalmia, an eye disease caused by lack of vitamin A, became prevalent causing blindness due to ulceration and keratomalacia, generally in one eye. It became common in workhouses and among children: 13,000 cases were recorded in 1849 and 27,000 in 1850. Taken from The Truth Behind The Irish Famine. 72 Paintings, 472 eyewitness quotes. http://www.jerrymulvihill.com

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Ireland 1845–52

Asenath Nicholson: “They walk fearlessly upon dangerous precipices and even descend to the sea in search of eggs, which the seagulls deposit there in the sides of the cliffs. Two men were dashed from a fearful height and dreadfully mangled, one was killed instantly, and the other lingered a few weeks and died.” The starving […]

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#OTD in 1984 – ‘Do They Know It’s Christmas?’, was released by Band-Aid, to aid famine relief in Ethiopia.

‘Do They Know It’s Christmas?’ is a charity single organised by Bob Geldof, who was the lead singer of The Boomtown Rats. He got the idea after watching a BBC documentary on famine in Ethiopia. Geldof wrote the lyrics and Midge Ure from the band Ultravox wrote the music and produced the track, which was […]

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Edward Delaney’s ‘Famine’ Memorial

Edward Delaney (1930–2009) was an Irish sculptor born in Claremorris, Co Mayo in 1930. His best known works include the 1967 statue of Wolfe Tone and ‘famine’ memorial [in memory of the victims of An Gorta Mór 1845-1852] at the northeastern corner of St Stephen’s Green in Dublin and the statue of Thomas Davis in College […]

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Ireland 1845–52

When it became a matter of eating or being eaten by the dogs and rats, the people killed, skinned, and ate the dogs and rats. Trapped rats were often chopped up, out of sight of the children, and a white, rabbit-like meat added to whatever gruel or herbal soup was cooking in the pot.” Taken […]

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The Irish Language was Muted During The Great Hunger 1845–52

The Irish were renowned for their love of education and embraced the opportunity to have their children educated only to discover that their native language, if still spoken by the children, was banned from the classroom. The introduction of the notorious ‘tally stick’ ensured that the students did not speak a single word of their […]

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