#OTD in 1922 – The Parliament of the occupied six counties of Northern Ireland opt out of the Free State.

The parliament of Northern Ireland exercises its option to opt out of the Irish Free State and petitions King George V: “MOST GRACIOUS SOVEREIGN, We, your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal subjects, the Senators and Commons of Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled, having learnt of the passing of the Irish Free State Constitution Act, 1922, […]

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#OTD in 1921 – Éamon de Valera Summons Collins, Griffith to Emergency Meeting.

Disturbed at reports from London as to the signing of the Treaty, a furious De Valera issued an announcement that ‘in view of the nature of the Treaty with Great Britain, members of the cabinet in London were to provide an immediate report to a Cabinet meeting arranged for the next day, 8 December at […]

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#OTD in 1879 – Birth of Anti-Treaty Nationalist and Politician, Austin Stack, in Tralee, Co Kerry.

Under the influence of his father, Austin Stack joined the local Young Ireland Society and the local branch of the Irish National Foresters, and was a keen student of Irish history. Appalled at the Cinderella status of Gaelic football and hurling, he co-founded the John Mitchel club in Tralee and became its secretary. The remarkable […]

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#OTD in 1679 – St. Oliver Plunkett, Archbishop of Armagh, is accused of instigating the ‘Irish Popish’ Plot and arrested.

The late 1670s under Charles II were a special time in British history during which religious controversy ran high. The rivalry between the king, who issued a Declaration of Indulgence suspending all laws punishing Roman Catholics and other religious dissenters, and a strongly Anglican Parliament had reached its peak. In Ireland the Catholic Church had […]

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#OTD in 1921 – The Anglo-Irish Treaty is signed, ending the Irish War of Independence.

“Think, what have I got for Ireland? Something she has wanted these past 700 years. Will anyone be satisfied at the bargain? Will anyone? I tell you this, I have signed my death warrant. I thought at the time how odd, how ridiculous —a bullet may just as well have done the job five years […]

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#OTD in Irish History | 6 December:

In the Liturgical Calendar, today is the Feast of St Nicholas. St Nicholas (Naomh Nioclás) is believed to have been buried in Newtown Jerpoint in Kilkenny some 800 years ago. 1679 – St. Oliver Plunkett, Archbishop of Armagh, is accused of instigating the ‘Irish Popish’ Plot and arrested. 1745 – Charles Edward Stuart’s army begins […]

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#OTD in 1720 – One of the most successful pirates, a feisty Cork-born red-head, called Anne Bonny, avoided execution after Calico Jack’s ship was captured by a band of pirate-hunters.

Anne Bonny was the illegitimate daughter of lawyer William Cormac and his housemaid. They immigrated to America after Anne’s birth and settled on a plantation near Charleston, South Carolina. A headstrong young woman ‘with a fierce and courageous temper’, she eloped with James Bonny against her father’s wishes. James took her to a pirates’ lair […]

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#OTD in 1921 – After lengthy negotiations, the British give the Irish a deadline to accept or reject the Anglo-Irish treaty.

Negotiations on Irish independence from Britain enter their final and crucial stage at Downing Street. The Irish delegates including Michael Collins and Arthur Griffith had returned from an acrimonious cabinet meeting in Dublin where unfortunately clarity did not exist. The negotiators again met with the British team which included Lloyd George and Winston Churchill. It […]

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#OTD in 1920 – Three Bandon members of the IRA were killed in an ambush set by the Essex Regiment.

Three IRA men were shot dead on this date and the two deserters from the Essex Regiment were shot by the IRA as a result. The IRA believed their three men were killed as a result of the two deserters setting up a ‘sting’ to trap the IRA. During the height of the war, two […]

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#OTD in 1921 – Dáil Cabinet Discusses Treaty Proposals.

Following an acrimonious and poorly written meeting minutes, Michael Collins and colleagues were asked to return to London for further negotiations. The Irish delegation consisted of Collins, Arthur Griffith (Chairman of the Delegation), Robert Barton (Minister for Economic Affairs), George Gavan Duffy and Eamonn Duggan. The delegates were styled ‘Envoys Plenipotentiary’ and given power to […]

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