#OTD in 1921 – 18–19: Burgery Ambush | West Waterford IRA under Pax Whelan, George Lennon and George Plunkett from Dublin HQ, ambushed a convoy of Black and Tans returning to Dungarvan via the Burgery.

‘Comeragh’s Rugged Hills’ (Pat Keating) It’s long years since I bade farewell For it is my sad fate Our land oppressed by tyrant laws I had to emigrate… When on my pillow I recline On a foreign land to rest The thoughts of my dear native home Still throbs within my heart When silence overcomes […]

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#OTD in 1921 – 18–19: Burgery Ambush: West Waterford IRA under Pax Whelan, George Lennon and George Plunkett from Dublin HQ, ambushed a convoy of Black and Tans returning to Dungarvan via the Burgery.

‘Comeragh’s Rugged Hills’ (Pat Keating) It’s long years since I bade farewell For it is my sad fate Our land oppressed by tyrant laws I had to emigrate… When on my pillow I recline On a foreign land to rest The thoughts of my dear native home Still throbs within my heart When silence overcomes […]

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#OnThisDay in 1921 – The IRA ambush a convoy of RIC and Black and Tans near Dungarvan, Co Waterford.

George Lennon had begun fighting Crown forces at age fifteen, was twice imprisoned, and fought on the Republican side in the Civil War and commanded his own Flying Column in Waterford. George spent his days seizing weapons and holding up troop trains. His role as a commander meant he also made life and death decisions […]

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1921 – The IRA ambush a convoy of RIC and Black and Tans near Dungarvan, Co Waterford.

George Lennon had begun fighting Crown forces at age fifteen, was twice imprisoned, and fought on the Republican side in the Civil War and commanded his own Flying Column in Waterford. George spent his days seizing weapons and holding up troop trains. His role as a commander meant he also made life and death decisions […]

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Today in Irish History – 16th March:

Feast Day of Abbán moccu Corbmaic (d. 520?) also Eibbán or Moabba, is a saint in Irish tradition. He was associated, first and foremost, with Mag Arnaide (Moyarney or Adamstown, near New Ross, Co. Wexford) and with Cell Abbáin (Killabban, Co. Laois). His cult was, however, also connected to other churches elsewhere in Ireland, notably […]

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Today in Irish History – 4th March:

1704 – Penal law ‘to prevent the further growth of popery’ restricts landholding rights for Catholics; gavelkind is reimposed on Catholics (unless the eldest son converts to Protestantism, in which case he inherits the whole); a ‘sacramental test’ for public office is introduced, directed mainly at Ulster Presbyterians. 1771 – John Ponsonby resigns as Speaker […]

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