#OTD in 1798 – United Irishmen Rebellion/Battle of New Ross.

The Battle of New Ross was the bloodiest of the 1798 rebellion. The southern force of the Wexford rebels had swelled to almost 10,000 by the morning of 5 June. Most of this force was armed only with pikes. If they could succeed in taking New Ross, the way would be open to spread the […]

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#OTD in Irish History – 5 June:

1646 – The Battle of Benburb: Eoghan Rua O’Neill, a superb military strategist, defeats Robert Munro’s Scottish army at Benburb in Co Tyrone. The victory is celebrated by Pope Innocent X with a Te Deum in Rome. 1686 – Richard Talbot, the Earl of Tyrconnell, appointed Lord Deputy of Ireland, (the first Catholic to hold […]

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#OTD in 1798 – United Irishmen Rebellion: Battle of Tuberneering, Co Wexford.

Irish rebels continue to have success against English troops. At the Battle of Tuberneering, Co Wexford, under the command of Fr John Murphy, rebels ambush in a narrow defile troops of the 4th Royal Dragoon Guards, militia and yeomanry auxiliaries, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Walpole. Walpole and 100 men were killed, the rest, throwing […]

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#OTD in 1171 – Diarmaid MacMurrough, king of Leinster, died in Ferns, Co Wexford.

Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, King of Leinster, is often considered to have been the most notorious traitor in Irish history. After succeeding to the throne of his father, Enna, in 1126, Diarmaid Mac Murchadha faced a number of rivals who disputed his claim to the kingship. He established his authority by killing or blinding seventeen rebel […]

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The Knights Templar in Ireland

The Knights Templar were founded about 1118 or shortly before by Hugh de Payens and other noble knights, for the primary purpose of protecting pilgrims travelling to Jerusalem. Because their headquarters were located near the site of the Temple of Solomon in Jerusalem, the order became known as Militia Templi Solomonis, or the soldiers of […]

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#OTD in 1877 – Birth of nationalist revolutionary, Michael O’Hanrahan, who was executed for his active role in the 1916 Easter Rising, in New Ross, Co Wexford.

 His father, Richard Hanrahan, was involved in the 1867 Fenian rising. The family moved to Carlow, where Michael was educated at Carlow Christian Brothers’ School and Carlow College Academy. On leaving school he worked various jobs including a period alongside his father in the cork-cutting business. In 1898 he joined the Gaelic League and in […]

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