‘How Young Cormac Mac Airt was Recogised as King’

In ancient times, the people of Ireland were internationally renowned for their love of law and their intricate justice system. Law was the articulation of fairness and the embodiment of justice, the application of the law to real scenarios was seen as a manifestation of justice in action, an affirmation of the natural harmonising order […]

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Fáilas

Fáilas was one of the four cities of the Tuatha Dé Danann, along with Gorias, Findias, and Murias, whence they came to Ireland. Morfessa was the instructor of learning there. In their departure the Tuatha Dé Danann took the magical stone of Fál with them. That stone would cry out to choose the rightful King […]

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Ancient Irish Olympics – The Lughnasa Games at Telltown

The Telltown or Tailtiu Games were said to have been instituted by the Gaelic god Lú Lamhfada Samildanách – Lugh­ the Long-Armed Master of the Arts, and are considered to be the Irish Olympics Games. They predate the Greek Olympics by about 1200 years and it could be reasonably speculated that the Irish Telltown Games […]

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#OTD in Irish History – 21 December:

Today is the Winter Solstice, the shortest day and longest night of the year. While the Solstices were not as important to the ancient Irish as the major fire festivals, they were nonetheless celebrated. Of the Solstices and Equinoxes, the Winter Solstice was the most important, since it marked the rebirth of the sun after […]

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How the Irish Influenced Christmas Traditions

In much the same way that the modern interpretation of Halloween descended from the Celtic pagan celebration of Samhain, several important pre-Christian Irish traditions have been incorporated into the winter holiday season. Prior to the introduction of Christianity during the early 5th century, Ireland was home to the Celts, a pagan civilisation which worshipped many […]

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Paud O’Donoghue – Heroic Blacksmith of the 1798 United Irishmen Rebellion

We have heard of the great names of the leaders and organisers of the 1798 rebellion, the men who tried to break the iron rules which oppressed the country and had the vast majority of the population treated little better than animals. Their names are remembered in song and story and enshrined in the history […]

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The Celtic Goddess, Boann

BOANN (Boínd, Boínn) is the Goddess of water, fertility, inspiration and knowledge. Her name is interpreted as ‘white cow’ (bó fhionn) in the Dindsenchas. According to the Lebor Gabála Érenn she was the daughter of Delbáeth, of the Tuatha Dé Danann. Her husband is variously Nechtan, Elcmar or Nuada Airgetlám. Her lover is the Dagda, […]

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#OTD in 1641 – The Battle of Julianstown: Rory O’More defeated government troops marching to raise the siege of Drogheda.

The Battle of Julianstown was fought during the Irish Rebellion of 1641, at Julianstown near Drogheda, Co Louth in November 1641. The prelude to the planned Siege of Drogheda 1641 by northern counties insurgents led by Sir Phelim O’Neil and supporters from Cavan and Monaghan to lay siege to the strategic garrison, grain store and […]

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#OTD in Irish History – 30 October:

1751 – Birth in Dublin of dramatist and orator, Richard Brinsley Sheridan. 1816 – Sir Richard Quain, physician to Queen Victoria, is born in Mallow, Co Cork. 1846 – Cork Examiner reports death by starvation. 1865 – Birth of Rose Maud Young (Róis Ní Ógáin) at Galgorm House, Ballymena, Co Antrim. She was educated at […]

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