#OTD in Irish History – 13 July:

1344 – Ralph de Ufford arrives in Ireland as justiciar with a small English army and investigates the situation in Cork. 1809 – Founding of the Dublin Harp Society. 1815 – Birth of physician, surgeon, newspaper proprietor, journalist and politician, John Gray, in Co Mayo. Gray was active both in municipal and national government for […]

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#OTD in Irish History – 8 July:

In the Liturgical calendar the Feast Day of Saint Kilian, also spelled Killian (or Cillian). He was an Irish missionary bishop and the apostle of Franconia (nowadays the northern part of Bavaria), where he began his labours towards the end of the 7th century. According to Irish sources, Kilian was born in Mullagh, Co Cavan […]

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#OTD in 1897 – Birth of Tom Barry, in Co Kerry, one of the most prominent guerrilla leaders in the Irish Republican Army during the Irish War of Independence.

As Commander of the 3rd West Cork Flying Column, Tom Barry was one of the great architects of modern guerrilla warfare in Ireland’s fight for freedom. He has been controversial, not because he sought controversy, but mainly due to his decisiveness and his military acumen during the Irish War of Independence. The son of an […]

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#OTD in Irish History – 29 June:

In the Liturgical calendar, today is the Feast Day of Saint Peter and Paul. 1315 – The Irish annals state that Edward de Brus “took the hostages and lordship of the whole province of Ulster without opposition and they consented to him being proclaimed King of Ireland and all the Gaels of Ireland agreed to […]

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#OTD in Irish History – 26 June:

1110 – Birth of Diarmaid Mac Murchada, King of Leinster, best remembered for bringing the Anglo-Normans to Ireland, and one of the most execrated names in Irish history. Diarmaid eloped with Derbforgaill, wife of Tigernán Ua Ruairc [O’Rourke], taking also her substantial dowry, while her husband was on pilgrimage. 1657 – ‘Act for Convicting, Discovering […]

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#OTD in 1920 – The Secretary of State for War, Winston Churchill, suggested the formation of a “Special Emergency Gendarmerie, which would become a branch of the Royal Irish Constabulary.”

In response to ongoing violence and rebellion in Ireland and a brutal campaign of attrition against members of the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC), the ADRIC was recruited in Great Britain from among ex-officers who had served in World War I, especially those who had served in the British Army (including the Royal Flying Corps). Most […]

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