#OTD in 1870 – Philanthropist and founder and director of homes for poor children, Thomas Barnardo, founded a boys’ orphanage at Stepney Causeway, in London.

Thomas John Barnardo was an Irish philanthropist and founder and director of homes for poor children. From the foundation of the first Barnardo’s home in 1867 to the date of Barnardo’s death, nearly 60,000 children had been taken in.   Barnardo was born in Dublin in 1845. In the 1860s, Barnardo opened a school in […]

Read More

Brehon Laws | Children and the status Women in early Ireland

Prior to the Anglo-Norman invasions Ireland was home to between 80-140 independent petty kingdoms called túatha. A person’s idea of nationhood was local to their home túath and kin-group (fine). Each túath had its king elected from among its noble grades, each had their own customs and traditions, styles of dress, particular songs and legends […]

Read More

#OTD in 1870 – Philanthropist and founder and director of homes for poor children, Thomas Barnardo, founded a boys’ orphanage at Stepney Causeway, in London.

Thomas John Barnardo was an Irish philanthropist and founder and director of homes for poor children. From the foundation of the first Barnardo’s home in 1867 to the date of Barnardo’s death, nearly 60,000 children had been taken in.   Barnardo was born in Dublin in 1845. In the 1860s, Barnardo opened a school in […]

Read More

Brehon Laws | Children and the status Women in early Ireland

Prior to the Anglo-Norman invasions Ireland was home to between 80-140 independent petty kingdoms called túatha. A person’s idea of nationhood was local to their home túath and kin-group (fine). Each túath had its king elected from among its noble grades, each had their own customs and traditions, styles of dress, particular songs and legends […]

Read More

“The “good” and the “bad” people – supernatural powers ever present to bless or to harm, were very real to the Irish peasant.

In Connemara it was believed that the “bad” people run away with little boys but not with girls, so boys were dressed in petticoats to deceive them until they were of age to protect themselves.” Petticoats, may protect him from wicked fairies, but they cannot conceal the masculine character of this stern-faced Connemara boy escorting […]

Read More

#OTD in 1870 – Philanthropist and founder and director of homes for poor children, Thomas Barnardo, founded a boys’ orphanage at Stepney Causeway, in London.

Thomas John Barnardo was an Irish philanthropist and founder and director of homes for poor children. From the foundation of the first Barnardo’s home in 1867 to the date of Barnardo’s death, nearly 60,000 children had been taken in.   Barnardo was born in Dublin in 1845. In the 1860s, Barnardo opened a school in […]

Read More

Brehon Laws: Children and the status Women in early Ireland

Prior to the Anglo-Norman invasions Ireland was home to between 80-140 independent petty kingdoms called túatha. A person’s idea of nationhood was local to their home túath and kin-group (fine). Each túath had its king elected from among its noble grades, each had their own customs and traditions, styles of dress, particular songs and legends […]

Read More

“The “good” and the “bad” people – supernatural powers ever present to bless or to harm, were very real to the Irish peasant.

In Connemara it was believed that the “bad” people run away with little boys but not with girls, so boys were dressed in petticoats to deceive them until they were of age to protect themselves.” Petticoats, may protect him from wicked fairies, but they cannot conceal the masculine character of this stern-faced Connemara boy escorting […]

Read More

#OTD in 1870 – Philanthropist and founder and director of homes for poor children, Thomas Barnardo, founded a boys’ orphanage at Stepney Causeway, in London.

Thomas John Barnardo was an Irish philanthropist and founder and director of homes for poor children. From the foundation of the first Barnardo’s home in 1867 to the date of Barnardo’s death, nearly 60,000 children had been taken in. Barnardo was born in Dublin in 1845. In the 1860s, Barnardo opened a school in the East […]

Read More

Brehon Laws: Family, Children and the Status of Women in Early Ireland

Prior to the Anglo-Norman invasions Ireland was home to between 80-140 independent petty kingdoms called túatha. A person’s idea of nationhood was local to their home túath and kin-group (fine). Each túath had its king elected from among its noble grades, each had their own customs and traditions, styles of dress, particular songs and legends […]

Read More