Mass burial pits in Skibbereen, Cork

In the autumn of 1846, it became clear how dire the situation in Ireland was. The potato was diseased and inedible. It was emigration, starvation, or the workhouse. People began to flood into the Workhouses. Based on indoor relief, they could not cope with the overcrowding, the disease and the deaths. Corpses, without coffins, were […]

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Key Events in Irish History

An island people the Irish may be, yet the history of Ireland has never been intolerant or inward-looking. Instead, it is a story of a people profoundly aware of the wider world – its threats, its possibilities and its advantages. In addition, while the English and British connection will always remain key to any reading […]

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The Irish Genocide 1845-52

Robert Whyte: “On May 26th 1847, thirty vessels with 10,000 Irish emigrants were waiting at Grosse Isle, Canada. On May 31st forty vessels were waiting, extending in a line two miles down the St. Lawrence, Canada.”The life expectancy of the survivors was 8 years. Taken form The Truth Behind The Irish Famine. 72 paintings, 400 […]

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The Irish Genocide | 1845-52

Asenath Nicholson | “The police were called after a man in an emaciated condition was found in a barnyard eating turf. He died shortly afterwards. If you have never seen a starving human being, may you never!” Taken from the book ‘The Truth Behind The Irish Famine’, 72 Paintings, 400 eye witness quotes. Signed copies: […]

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The Great Hunger Memorial at Macy Park in Ardsley, New York

The Great Hunger Memorial at Macy Park in Ardsley, New York was unveiled on 26 June 2001 to commemorate the suffering of millions of Irish who died or were forced to leave lreland. The monument’s sculptor, Eamonn O’Doherty of Ireland, describes the memorial as comprising three related elements. The first represents five members of an […]

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#OTD in 1847 – The Passing of the Irish Poor Law Extension Act.

The Poor Law Amendment Act of 1847 marked a major shift in British government policy with respect to An Gorta Mór distress in Ireland. Under the new act Irish property owners and tenants would henceforth bear the full burden of fiscal responsibility for relief, which was to be administered solely by the Irish poor-law system. […]

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#OTD in 1849 – The brig Hannah transported emigrants to Canada during An Gorta Mór.

The brig Hannah transported emigrants to Canada during An Gorta Mór. She is known for the terrible circumstances of her 1849 shipwreck, in which the captain and two officers left the sinking ship aboard the only lifeboat, leaving passengers and the rest of the crew to fend for themselves. Hannah was built at Norton, New […]

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#OTD in 1847 – The American relief ship, USS Jamestown, landed supplies in Cork for An Gorta Mór victims.

More than a century ago, James Coleman published a short article, ‘Voyage of the “Jamestown”’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, in which he recounted the arrival of the US warship Jamestown in Cork Harbour on Monday 12 April 1847. The vessel had departed from the Charlestown Navy Yard, Massachusetts, two […]

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#OTD in 1947 – Death of Henry Ford, automobile production pioneer and son of Irish immigrants.

“When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it.” –Henry Ford Henry Ford’s father, William Ford, was born in Co Cork and was one of many to emigrate from Ireland due to poverty and hunger (An Gorta Mór). Ford visited Ireland in 1912, 65 […]

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#OTD in 1807 – Birth of Sir Charles Edward Trevelyan, 1st Baronet, KCB, a British civil servant and Governor of Madras.

Trevelyan is referred to in the modern Irish folk song The Fields of Athenry about ‘An Gorta Mór’. For his actions, he is commonly considered one of the most detested figures in Irish history, along with the likes of Cromwell. Image | Charles Trevelyan accompanied by a poem written by Joe Canning SaveSave SaveSave

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