An Gorta Mór | Diaspóra na Gael

The potato is a tuberous vegetable that is native to the Andes of South America. Following the Spanish exploration and exploitation of the South American Indians, the potato was introduced to Europe where it had a profound, beneficial effect on diets of Europeans from Ireland well into Russia. It grew well all over Western Europe […]

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#OTD in 1845 – The arrival of the potato blight in Ireland is reported in the Dublin Evening Post.

To this day, all over Ireland the landscape bears mute testimony to the events that occurred in the horrific period from 1845–1850. Starvation graveyards offer silent tribute to the millions of Irish men, women, and children buried in unmarked mass graves. Thriving villages were replaced by heaps of moss-covered stones. Although historians have not agreed […]

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#OTD in 1847 – An Gorta Mór Mass Emigration.

A report by Canada’s Chief Superintendent of Emigration states the numbers of emigrants who had arrived this year were 56,855. In the same period of last year, 24,576 settlers reached the port, showing an increase this year of no less than 32,279. Source | Cork Examiner, 18 August 1847 The Montreal Pilot thus feelingly alludes […]

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#OTD in 1847 – The Passing of the Irish Poor Law Extension Act.

The Poor Law Amendment Act of 1847 marked a major shift in British government policy with respect to An Gorta Mór distress in Ireland. Under the new act Irish property owners and tenants would henceforth bear the full burden of fiscal responsibility for relief, which was to be administered solely by the Irish poor-law system. […]

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#OTD in 1847 – The American relief ship, USS Jamestown, landed supplies in Cork for An Gorta Mór victims.

More than a century ago, James Coleman published a short article, ‘Voyage of the “Jamestown”’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, in which he recounted the arrival of the US warship Jamestown in Cork Harbour on Monday 12 April 1847. The vessel had departed from the Charlestown Navy Yard, Massachusetts, two […]

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#OTD in 1807 – Birth of Sir Charles Edward Trevelyan, 1st Baronet, KCB, a British civil servant and Governor of Madras.

Trevelyan is referred to in the modern Irish folk song The Fields of Athenry about ‘An Gorta Mór’. For his actions, he is commonly considered one of the most detested figures in Irish history, along with the likes of Cromwell. Image | Charles Trevelyan accompanied by a poem written by Joe Canning SaveSave SaveSave

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An Gorta Mór / Diaspóra na Gael

The potato is a tuberous vegetable that is native to the Andes of South America. Following the Spanish exploration and exploitation of the South American Indians, the potato was introduced to Europe where it had a profound, beneficial effect on diets of Europeans from Ireland well into Russia. It grew well all over Western Europe […]

Read More

‘On Yonder Hillside Sloping’ © Joe Canning 2018. All Rights Reserved.

‘On Yonder Hillside Sloping’ © Joe Canning 2018. All Rights Reserved.   On yonder hillside sloping, A fallen house I see, Where boiled the blackened saucepan, To peasant family feed.   Where once was baked the oaten scone, All dressed with fresh churned butter, Where once they prayed in grateful thanks For the tatties on […]

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#OTD in 1845 – The arrival of the potato blight in Ireland is reported in the Dublin Evening Post.

To this day, all over Ireland the landscape bears mute testimony to the events that occurred in the horrific period from 1845–1850. Starvation graveyards offer silent tribute to the millions of Irish men,women,and children buried in unmarked mass graves. Thriving villages were replaced by heaps of moss-covered stones. Although historians have not agreed on the […]

Read More

‘An Opening of Eyes’ © Joe Canning 2018. All Rights Reserved.

‘An Opening of Eyes’ © Joe Canning 2018. All Rights Reserved.   Sit a while and listen whilst a tale I tell ye all, Close thine eyes and picture well the scene. Let me take ye back to sad and distant times, To places like Mayo and Skibbereen.   Gaze across a barren field, see […]

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