#OTD in 1966 – In 19th Century Dublin, Montgomery St was the largest red-light district in Europe. At least 1,600 ladies conducted their business and the future King Edward VII lost his virginity there. This specialisation was immortalised in the song ‘Monto’ (Take Me Up To Monto) by the Dubliners, recorded on this date.

Image | Elliot Place, Dublin, c 1930s

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2 thoughts on “#OTD in 1966 – In 19th Century Dublin, Montgomery St was the largest red-light district in Europe. At least 1,600 ladies conducted their business and the future King Edward VII lost his virginity there. This specialisation was immortalised in the song ‘Monto’ (Take Me Up To Monto) by the Dubliners, recorded on this date.

  1. On 24 May 1830, Edward Bunbury Foster of 100, Pitt Street, Sydney, was appointed an Inspector of Slaughterhouses, and of Cattle slaughtered, under the Act of the Governor and Council, No. 4, 1830, by his Excellency the Governor. (Sydney Gazette, 25 May 1830).

    In November 1832 he was assigned a convict by name of Jakes George, who had arrived on the Lady Harwood, as a waiter. (Sydney Gazette and New South Wales advertiser, 29th of November 1832)

    ‘mr Bunbury Foster, Inspector of Slaughterhouses, appeared on a summons to answer and information for tethering his horse by the bridle to the Military Barrack gate at the Treasury Office, on the 6th of February. A constable, named Smith, deposed to the fact; and in answer to a question from Mr Foster, whether the horse was not tied to that part of the gate where the carriageway crosses the footpath, denied that such was the case. The Bench, however, without requiring any proof, even whether the carriageway does away with the footpaths, dismissed the case. Habitual infringers of this provision of the Act will do well to remember this loophole. Sydney Gazette, 27th Feb, 1834.

    He was again elected Inspector of slaughter houses, on the motion of Alterman Broughton, in 1843. (Sydney morning Herald, 16th of November 1843).

    However, the following year he resigned, to be replaced by Charles oh.Middleton as inspector for slaughter houses, and cattle intended for slaughter in the city of Sydney. (colonial observer Sydney, 9 may 1844)

    New insolvents – Sydney morning Herald, 14 April 1845 Edward Bunbury Foster, late cattle inspector, now watchmaker. That’s, £113 1S 9 1/2 D.; assets – personal property, 6 pounds. Balance deficiency, £107 1s 9 1/2d. Hutchinson Bell, Official Assignee.

    On 14th of November 1849, the Sydney morning Herald reported on an inquest that had been held at eight in the heads, the email in, Bath Hurst Street, on view of the body of Ellen Ryan. Mr EB Foster, of Bathurst-street, deposed that deceased had been in his service for a number of years, and was addicted to intemperate drinking; on Saturday last, she was unwell, some medicine was procured for, and administered to, her; on Saturday night she went to bed about 8 o’clock, and in a few minutes afterwards jumped up in bed, and appeared to be insensible; on Sunday morning, witness went for Dr Cook, but on his arrival she was on the point of death. Dr Cook having the polls that in his opinion death was the affects of long continued habits of intemperance, the finding of the Jury was, died from pre-existing disease, the effects of intemperance.

    ‘Mr Charles be faster.– it will be remembered that Master CB Foster was formally a pupil of Mr Alpen, professor of music in this town, and that with the view of acquiring a more extensive knowledge of the profession he was destined to follow, proceeded to Melbourne. It affords us pleasure now, as it has done on previous occasions, to note the progress of our light young fellow townsman. The latest compliment paid to Mr Foster is described in the following paragraph taken from the Argus of Monday last: “A very pleasing event Took place on Saturday night at Hockin’s Assembly Rooms, when the members of the German Liedertafel invited their honorary pianist, Mr CB faster, to dine with them previous to his departure for New Zealand. Mr Foster has now been in gauged by Mr Simonsen as pianist and conductor for the new Opera Company which has been recently organised, and takes its departure this day (Monday) for the country above named. We feel glad on this account, because when Mr Foster came here recently we recognise his talent, and have in Deverd between that time and this is to do full justice to it. He would not have been selected for the work he had now undertaken unless it were for superior skill. It may please some readers to know that although Mr Foster comes here but recently from the North of the Murray, he is a native of our Victorian Williamstown. The dinner we refer to was greatly enjoyed. The kindliest feelings prevailed throughout. The toast of the evening was proposed in most felicitous terms by Mr Eugene Ascherberg, who, on behalf of the society, presented the guest with the societies medal in gold, with a gold clasp attached, bearing a complimentary inscription. In Mr Foster’s reply, he gave prominence to the wish to be back again once more and monks the members of the Melbourne German Liedertafel, and expressed, in most handsome terms, his obligation to, and high admiration of, do superior talents of the conductor, Mr Julius Siede. When the speechmaking was done, the remainder of the time was spent in Pleasant converse, diversified occasionally by solo and part singing by the members of the society, and some charming performances at the pianoforte by Mr Foster. – Border post dad

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