#OTD in 2002 – Death of Spike Milligan, a comedian, writer, musician, poet, playwright, soldier, and actor.

‘All I ask is the chance to prove that money can’t make me happy.’ –Spike Milligan

Spike Milligan’s early life was spent in India, where he was born, but the majority of his working life was spent in the United Kingdom. He became an Irish citizen in 1962 after the British government declared him stateless.

Spike Milligan, Terence Alan Patrick Seán Milligan, was born in Ahmadnagar, India. He was an Irish writer and comedian who led the comic troupe featured on the 1950s British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) radio hit ‘The Goon Show’. His anarchic sense of absurdity and unique comic genius made him a model for succeeding generations of comedians and paved the way for the Monty Python brand of alternative comedy.

Milligan was raised in India and Burma (Myanmar), where his father was in the British army, and moved to England with his family in 1933. He served in the army during World War II and was wounded in combat. Milligan struggled with manic-depressive illness that lasted the rest of his life. Toward the end of the war, Milligan met Harry Secombe, and they worked together entertaining the troops. After the war the pair, along with Peter Sellers and Michael Bentine, began spending time at the Grafton Arms pub, where they developed their comedy routines. BBC radio began broadcasting the group’s work in 1951, as Crazy People, and in 1952 it was renamed ‘The Goon Show’. As such it continued until early 1960 (though Bentine soon left the show) and became a cult classic.

Milligan later acted onstage and in small parts in movies—including ‘Monty Python’s Life of Brian’ (1979), and wrote numerous books of poems, war memoirs, the play ‘The Bedsitting Room’ (with John Antrobus; first performed 1962), and a number of television series. He also supported a multitude of causes, especially those involving the environment. Because Milligan’s father was Irish and Milligan was born in India, and despite Milligan’s years of military service, the British government did not consider him a citizen; rather than take an oath of allegiance, he took Irish citizenship. Nonetheless, he was made an honorary Commander of the British Empire in 1992 and was given an honorary knighthood in 2000.

Photo: The headstone of Spike Milligan’s grave, formerly in the grounds of St Thomas’ Winchelsea, East Sussex. The name of his last wife has since been added along with birth and death dates and an additional epitaph. The epitaph reads Dúirt mé leat go raibh mé breoite, Irish for ‘I told you I was ill.’ © Photo by James Ryan

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